The Cosmos and the Spiritual: A Fabric of Beliefs in the Work of Manuel de la Cruz González and Luisa González de Sáenz / El cosmos y lo espiritual: un entramado de creencias en las obras de Manuel de la Cruz González y Luisa González de Sáenz

“In cosmic beauty, there is no place for degrees or locations in time and space: Cosmic beauty is infinite. Words like pretty, ugly, tragic, funny, and useful—the abiding limits in the brief race toward death—on the other hand, are part and parcel of sensual reactions.”1Manuel de la Cruz González, “El arte como integración cósmica” [1957], Escena: Revista de las artes, 74, no. 1 (2014): 168: “La belleza cósmica no admite gradaciones o localizaciones geográficas o cronológicas, es infinita, mientras que las reacciones sensuales llevan aparejados los términos de bonito, feo, trágico, humorístico, útil, límites constantes en su fugaz carrera hacia la Muerte.” Unless otherwise noted, all translations are mine.

With these words, Costa Rican artist Manuel de la Cruz González (1909–1986) describes the crucial difference between an art that leads to the infinite—abstract art, in his case—and a transient art that reflects immediate emotion—a characteristic particularly evident, in his view, in figurative art.2On the art of Manuel de la Cruz González, see María Alejandra Triana, El arte como integración cósmica: Manuel de la Cruz González y la abstracción geométrica (San José: Fundación Museos del Banco Central, 2010). Manuel de la Cruz understood art as a tool to integrate humankind into the universality of the cosmos in order to yield cosmic beauty. The quote above is taken from his lecture “El arte como integración cósmica” (“Art as Cosmic Integration”), which he gave in Maracaibo, Venezuela, in 1957. In this talk, the artist laid out his theories on the cosmic value of geometric abstraction. Over the course of the 1950s, he not only lectured and wrote on these ideas, he also developed a body of work that reflected his thinking, a line of production that he would extend into the early 1970s.

Figure 1. Manuel de la Cruz González. Equilibrio Cósmico. Lacquer on wood. 1965. Image courtesy Museo de Arte Costarricense

Also in the 1950s, another artist from Costa Rica embarked on a body of work tied to the transcendent. But unlike Manuel de la Cruz, Luisa González de Sáenz (1899–1982) did not attempt to integrate universal truth into her art.3On the work of Luisa González de Sáenz, see Carlos Francisco Echeverría, Una mirada risueña a lo terrible: Luisa González de Sáenz (San José: Universidad Veritas, 2010); see also the most recent retrospective of the artist’s work, Luisa González de Sáenz: Trascender lo terrenal (Luisa González de Sáenz: Transcending the Earthly), Museo de Arte Costarricense, San José, November 24, 2022–March 31, 2023, https://www.mac.go.cr/es/exposicion/trascender-lo-terrenal-luisa-gonzalez-de-saenz Instead, she professed to accept that it was impossible to access one’s ultimate reality. In the paintings, drawings, and stained-glass works that she produced in the 1950s through the end of her life, landscape and the human figure predominate; her lines and brushstrokes convey a specific way of perceiving the natural environment, humankind, and the spirituality in which both are steeped (fig. 2).For Luisa, the perceptible forms in her surroundings were the elements in which it was possible to experience and even see the transcendent.

Figure 2. Luisa González Feo de Sáenz. Sin título (montaña y lago). S.f. Oil on canvas glued to cardboard. Image courtesy Museos del Banco Central

In this essay, I will address these artists’ visions of the spiritual and the transcendent and how their work reveals predominant twentieth-century stances on the role of art in the representation and transformation of the spiritual.4For a brief introduction to this question, see Charlene Spretnak, The Spiritual Dynamic in Modern Art: Art History Reconsidered, 1800 to the Present (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2014).Manuel de la Cruz exemplifies an artist who understood art and his own work as evidence of the vibrations of an irrefutable universal truth. Art, for him, was a device that when understood in terms of cosmic beauty, transports the human being to an absolute human state. Luisa, on the other hand, held that one cannot know ultimate truth in this lifetime. That said, she expressed no doubt that the natural environment and humankind are imbued in spirituality, an immanent charge so potent that it can change our very perception of things. Her work is not a device for integration, but instead the materialization of a spiritual world enmeshed in daily life.

Manuel de la Cruz González and Luisa González de Sáenz were part of the generation of pioneering Costa Rican artists who, in the 1930s, introduced the avant-garde to their country.5On the 1930s generation of artists in Costa Rica, see Eugenia Zavaleta O., Las exposiciones de artes plásticas en Costa Rica (1928–1937) (San José: Editorial UCR, 2004). In the late 1940s, Manuel de la Cruz ventured into abstraction, and in the early 1950s, he moved to Venezuela.6He was, in fact, a pioneer of abstract art in Costa Rica. On early abstraction in Costa Rica, see Eugenia Zavaleta O., Los inicios del arte abstracto en Costa Rica, 1958–1971 (San José: Museo de Arte Costarricense, 1994). It was in the context of a Venezuelan art scene influenced by Neo-Plasticism, a movement spearheaded by Piet Mondrian (Dutch, 1872–1944), that Manuel de la Cruz developed his theories.7Esteban A. Calvo, “Manuel de la Cruz González, su noción de ‘arte cósmico’: La geometría, el color, la proporción y el concepto filosófico de creación,” Escena: Revista de las artes 72, no. 2 (2014): 103. Early in her painting career, Luisa focused on landscapes and portraits. Starting in the late 1940s, her work grew more hermetic as she looked to the natural landscape of the Costa Rican highlands. At that juncture, her palette darkened, and her images became suggestive of an adverse and unstable environment, one that inspired a degree of abstraction in her depictions of nature. The artist addressed a range of religious and mythical themes, and she almost obsessively fashioned scenes in which nature takes precedence over humankind. Though she pursued her artistic career in Costa Rica, a collection of drawings preserved by the Sáenz-Shelby family suggests that the natural settings and cities she visited in the United States and Europe also influenced her production. Indeed, these places resonate in many of the sketches closely tied to the work she began in the 1950s.

In 1956, Manuel de la Cruz published the essay “El arte abstracto: Realidad de nuestro tiempo” (“Abstract Art: The Reality of Our Times”) in the Costa Rican magazine Brecha. In this text, he states that abstract art is the “reaffirmation of eternal aesthetic truths.”8Manuel de la Cruz González, “El arte abstracto: Realidad de nuestro tiempo,” Brecha 1, no. 1 (September 1956): 8: “reafirmación de las eternas verdades estéticas.” Abstraction, in other words, was, in his mind, a universal art that transcends geographic boundaries. In his lecture in Maracaibo in 1957, the artist suggested that the components that make up the universe are number, rhythm, order, and balance. He described an eternal cosmos in which any independent form is ultimately tied to a universal whole, where life consists of endless integration and reintegration of energy, and the human spirit and the universe are vibrantly connected.9González, “El arte como integración cósmica,” 165. From this perspective, he argued, art can be seen as “a way to unleash certain reactions we call aesthetic. . . . It is aimed at a certain aspect of the human in an inevitable pursuit of attuned cosmic vibrations [where] the human moment is seen as a bridge to its universal integration.”10González, “El arte como integración cósmica,” 167: “una manera de provocar determinadas reacciones que llamamos estéticas . . . [que] se dirigen a determinada porción de lo humano en inevitable búsqueda de vibraciones cósmicas afines, tomando el momento humano como puente hacia su integración universal.” These “cosmic vibrations” are what is emitted by the harmonic rhythm manifested in the geometric shapes, lines, and colors used in painting, which itself facilitates cosmic integration (fig. 3).

Figure 3. Manuel de la Cruz González. Abstracción Geométrica. Lacquer on wood. 1957. Image courtesy Museos del Banco Central

Manuel de la Cruz presented three routes—the spontaneous, the intuitive, and the intellectual—by which art can lead to cosmic integration. Based on these, he outlined categories for an art history in which abstract art from the first half of the twentieth century corresponds to the intellectual route. That said, all three routes are revealed throughout history, and the art at play in each of them is tied to the cosmic eternity that envelops humankind.11González, “El arte como integración cósmica,” 168–69, 174–75.Manuel de la Cruz looked to the “inner necessity” declared by Vasily Kandinsky (French, born Russia. 1866–1944) in 1911 in Über das Geistige in der Kunst: Insbesondere in der Malerei (Concerning the Spiritual in Art: Especially in Painting) to understand major historical events in the world of the arts and culture. In “El Cuadro Tridimensional” (“The Three-Dimensional Painting”), which he published in 1958, Manuel de la Cruz asserts: “Both during his era and beyond it, Fra Angelico is interesting—and will always be interesting . . . not because he painted angels, but because of how he painted them. He imbued them in that mystical oneness common to all men, even when that zeal is directed to Buddha or Quetzalcoatl. He is interesting, then, because of how he expressed his ‘inner necessity.’”12Manuel de la Cruz González, “El cuadro tridimensional,” Brecha 3, no. 3 (November 1958): 8: “Fran Angelico interesa e interesará siempre, en su época o fuera de ella . . . no porque pintó ángeles, sino el cómo los pintó inbuyéndoles esa unión mística que es común a todos los hombres aún [sic] cuando ese fervor se canalice hacia Buda o Quezlcoatl [sic], vale decir, cómo manifestó su ‘necesidad interior.’”

Manuel de la Cruz expressed that he saw the transition from “primitive” thought to rational thought, and that the final route—the intellectual—was, for him, the one that lays out a path to truth, to “its cosmic reason, its vital, eternal and universal rhythms.”13González, “El arte como integración cósmica,” 169: “su razón cósmica, sus ritmos vitales, eternos y universales.” He argued that it is possible to imbue the work of art with the conditions that enable cosmic integration, and further, that these conditions are present to a large degree in the work of Mondrian and Kandinsky (figs. 4, 5). As he asserted in his 1957 lecture, “Both of them understood that the only way to reach the infinite rhythm is through abstraction, the elimination of any trace of reference, sensuality, or allegory, the total omission of the romantic.”14Manuel de la Cruz González refers here to Romanticism, the movement that, as we shall see shortly, acted as a parameter for and counterpoint to the modern abstraction project. González, “El arte como integración cósmica,” 170: “ambos comprendieron que sólo por la abstracción, la eliminación de la referencia, de lo sensual y alegórico, el olvido en fin de todo lo romántico, es que podía llegarse al ritmo infinito.”

Figure 4. Piet Mondrian. Composition in Oval with Color Planes 1. 1914. Oil on canvas, 42 3/8 x 31″ (107.6 x 78.8 cm. Acquired through purchase. © The Museum of Modern Art, New York
Figure 5. Vasily Kandinsky. Watercolor No. 13 (Aquarell no. 13). 1913. Watercolor, ink and pencil on paper, 12 5/8 x 16″ (32.1 x 40.6 cm). Acquired through Katherine S. Dreier Bequest. © 2024 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris. © The Museum of Modern Art, New York

In the context of this lecture and his essays, Manuel de la Cruz’s geometric abstract painting underscores his commitment to the notion of universality. In his Abstracción geométrica nº 8 (Geometric Abstraction No. 8; fig. 6), for example, flat color planes interact with horizontal, vertical, and diagonal lines, as well as with simple geometric shapes. In works like Equilibrio cósmico (Cosmic Balance), slightly curved lines generate a tension between color and form.15Manuel de la Cruz thus formed part of the great artistic project revolving around universality. Other artists throughout Latin America also took part, among them Joaquín Torres-García (Uruguayan, 1874–1949). Torres-García’s constructive universalism made indiscriminate use of signs and figures from different cultures, including from Indigenous and pre-Columbian civilizations.

Figure 6. Manuel de la Cruz González. Abstracción Geométrica No.8. C. 1957. Oil on fabric. Image courtesy Museos del Banco Central

Unlike Manuel de la Cruz González, Luisa González de Sáenz did not leave a body of writing describing her vision of art. What we have instead are brief interviews, critical reviews of her work over the course of decades, and the testimony of friends and family. In other words, Luisa appears to have been less inclined to describe her process. She seems to have been most interested in how art could become a daily means of expression. When her art was exhibited to the public, what was on display was her perception of the environment, the spiritual, and humanity.16Luisa was one of several women artists who incorporated spiritual themes. Others include Leonora Carrington (British, 1917–2011), Remedios Varo (Spanish, 1908–1963), Agnes Pelton (American, born Germany. 1881–1961), Wanda Gág (American, 1893–1946), and Rosaleen Norton (Australian, 1917–1979). While it is beyond the scope of this essay, the affinity between the work of these artists and Luisa’s production in Costa Rica merits further study. In figure 7, for instance, we see a landscape, in all its vastness and spirituality, overpowering the solitary individual and the path they have trodden. The night sky transforms into a flying creature that seems to have emerged from the night itself.

Figure 7. Luisa González Feo de Sáenz. Sin título. N.d. Ink drawing on paper. Image courtsey Museos del Banco Central

Luisa’s creative work is overwhelmingly figurative. Figuration was for her, as she stated in 1957, “the best form of expression [for me]. Truth is the ultimate pursuit of art and all forms of expression. [Figurative art] is my truth.”17Luisa González de Sáenz, quoted in “El arte del vitral en doña Luisa González de Sáenz,” by Norma Loaiza, La Nación 24, no. 7820(October 9, 1970): 53: “mejor forma de expresión, y como en arte y en toda manifestación se debe buscar la verdad, ésta es mi verdad.” She drew on highland landscapes—trees, mist, gusts of wind, and temperature—for that personal expression.18Una tarde de ella misma: Retrato de doña Luisa González de Sáenz, directed by Carlos Freer(San José: Centro Gandhi de Comunicación, Universidad para la Paz, Museo de Arte Costarricense, 1999), video recording. A DVD-format copy of this documentary is held at the Universidad Nacional de Costa Rica. The quality of the recording is poor, but the content of the video is conveyed. The artist believed that the inability of humankind to perceive nature differently was an impediment born of a spirit largely closed to sensory experience.19Juan Carlos Flores, “Luisa Gonzáles: Todos vivimos en la irrealidad,” Semanario Universidad, no. 404 (August 17, 1979): 11. In her mind, society shuts down the possibilities of the gaze available only to an open spirit. Her art, then, gradually came to engage not only what is observed by that spiritual vision, but also what is transformed, via the spiritual, in the human being and nature. As she states in a recording from Carlos Freer’s 1999 documentary Una tarde de ella misma: Retrato de doña Luisa González de Sáenz (An Evening of Herself: Portrait of Doña Luisa González de Sáenz): “I am not sure if there is such a thing as spiritual change, though that is something we all go through, right? We often evolve, and our spirit is transformed, without even realizing it, right? I gradually became very interested in the human soul, and I saw it as much in nature as in persons themselves.”20González, quoted in Freer, Una tarde de ella misma: “No sé si hay un cambio espiritual, que generalmente todos tenemos, ¿verdad? Hay ciertas evoluciones que sin darse uno cuenta va[n] transformando el espíritu, ¿verdad? Me fui interesando tanto, y ver en la naturaleza tanto [como] en las mismas personas, el alma humana.”

According to Costa Rican writer Abelardo Bonilla (1898–1969), Luisa had the ability “to materialize the spiritual, to render it visible, to make it our own; [and] to spiritualize matter, to render it impalpable—and that is no less our own.”21Abelardo Bonilla, “Agenda Luisa González Feo” [undated note from 1934]: “materializar lo espiritual, hasta hacerlo visible y nuestro; espiritualizar lo material hasta hacerlo impalpable, que es también hacerlo nuestro.” The agenda, which belongs to the Saénz-Shelby family, is held in the Repositorio Centroamericano de Patrimonio Cultural, Instituto de Investigación en Arte, Universidad de Costa Rica, https://repositorio.iiarte.ucr.ac.cr/handle/123456789/15533. Bonilla’s statement about Luisa González de Sáenz’s work is from 1934, which is striking. There is little known work by her from this time on the themes discussed here, and yet Bonilla’s words seem to foretell what would become patent in her art starting in the fifties. She would transfigure observable nature by means of a style characterized by strong brushstrokes or lines that yield an atmosphere so integral, adverse, and shifting that it veers into abstraction as the elements represented blur into one another. This is evident in an illustration she made to accompany the short story “María de la Soledad: Episodio en la vida del doctor Lunático” (“María de la Soledad: Episode in the Life of Doctor Lunatic”), which was written by her brother Mario González Feo (fig. 8). In this drawing, she has referenced two sentences uttered by the main character in the story: “How I wish I could feel the vital force of that transfigured evening. Because the whole evening was transfigured!”22Mario González, María de la Soledad y otras narraciones (San José: Imprenta Trejos Hermanos, 1967), 24: “ojalá pudiera sentir ahora la fuerza vital de aquella tarde transfigurada. ¡Porque toda la tarde estaba transfigurada!” Also relevant is the passage that precedes these sentences: “There are things and persons that are transfigured at a given moment by dint of the extraordinary force we call mystery. They are still themselves, but it is as if an inner light, an inward flame . . . lit them up and gave them an interior transparency—that is transfiguration.”23González, María de la Soledad, 24: “hay cosas y personas que en un momento dado, por la fuerza extraordinaria de lo que llamamos misterio, se transfiguran. Siguen siendo ellas pero una como luz interior, una llama interna . . . les da iluminación, transparencia interior: eso es, transfiguración.” The image shows a figure in a desolate landscape; her body is part of the natural space in general, but mostly it forms the rays of a “light” in the sky. We can distinguish between the terrain on which the figure stands and the sky, and we can sense the tension between that source of light and the figure. At the same time, the quality of the line gives these elements—figure, sky, light—a sense of mobility and adversity.

Figure 8. Luisa González Feo de Sáenz. Illustration for  “María de la Soledad: Episodio en la vida del Doctor Lunático”. 1967. Ink print on paper. González, Mario. María de la Soledad y otras narraciones. San José: Imprenta Trejos Hermanos. 1967. Image sourced from a copy housed in the Biblioteca Carlos Monge Alfaro, Universidad de Costa Rica

The idea that spiritual observation and expression are individual runs through the artist’s life and work: the soul is inevitably and innately alone, even when in the company of others.24Luisa González de Sáenz, quoted in Flores Zúñiga, “Luisa González,” 11. Most of the human figures that cross Luisa’s landscapes do so alone; when there is more than one figure, they do not seem to notice one another. Her work, on the other hand, is steeped not only in spiritual transformation and solitary pilgrimage, but also in acceptance of the impossibility of seeing the true face of transcendence or of life after death.

Luisa was fond of the Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyám, quatrains attributed to Omar Khayyam (Persian, 1048–1131), and she made several drawings inspired by it. The Rubaiyat values taking immediate pleasure in life, since human knowledge is categorically incapable of answering the fundamental questions faced by humanity, such as the reason for life and death. Luisa’s drawing of quatrain 68, for example, reflects these ideas (fig. 9): “We are no other than a moving row / Of Magic Shadow-shapes that come and go / Round with the Sun-illumined Lantern held / In Midnight by the Master of the Show.”25Edward FitzGerald, trans. and ed., Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám: The Astronomer-Poet of Persia (1859; San Francisco: Reader’s Library, 1891): 34. Here, once again, the artist has used light to transfigure space. With the force of her line, she makes us feel that we are witness to an inevitable transformation or transience, one that will affect both humankind and nature. In another sketch (fig. 10), she has transcribed a passage from quatrain 32, which discusses those places of knowledge inaccessible to humankind: “There was the Door to which I found no Key; / There was the Veil through which I could not see.”26FitzGerald, Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám, 25. Original text from Luisa’s sketch: “¡De esa puerta la llave no encontré yo jamás; ese velo ocultaba lo que existe detrás . . . !”

Figure 9. Luisa González Feo de Sáenz. Sin título. N.d. Ink drawing on paper. Sketchbook by Luisa González. Sáenz Shelby Family Collection. Image courtesy the Repositorio Centroamericano de Patrimonio Cultural
Figure 10. Luisa González Feo de Sáenz. Sin título, Boceto: la puerta cerrada, N.d. Drawing. Sáenz Shelby Family Collection. Image courtesy the Repositorio Centroamericano de Patrimonio Cultural

The representation here is more somber than in the other works discussed. A path in a desolate nighttime setting leads to a door, behind which lies the transcendental to which humans have no access. The faces and bodies of the three lantern-lit figures walking toward that door are covered. These figures do not have the key to that space of knowledge—to be sure, no one does.

It is entirely possible that Luisa’s art was influenced by literary and philosophical sources other than the Rubaiyat, though we cannot know for certain which ones. As previously mentioned, the artist did not make this information public. By attempting to reconstruct in part how the artist seems to have understood her work, we can say that she was conscious of a spiritual world that the human soul was capable of perceiving both in the soul itself and in the natural environment in which the soul unfolds. This interaction leads to a constant but solitary transformation of the soul and of nature in an individual spiritual experience that continues throughout existence. That sensibility is patent in Luisa’s work—as is the interaction between and mutual transformation of the individual and the environment. At the same time, she seems to have understood the limit of that experience; as is evident in her work, any other aspect of the transcendent, especially anything related to life after death, is shrouded in impenetrable mystery.

Manuel de la Cruz, on the other hand, made the points of reference for his artistic agenda known. These influences range from a Hegelian notion of history and trust in science to the aesthetic and spiritual theories of modern abstract artists who were, in turn, influenced by the Theosophical Society, which had its own stance on scientific advancement.27Benedetto Croce (1866–1952) was among the Hegelians Manuel de la Cruz looked to in, for instance, in writing his 1956 essay “El arte abstracto . . .,” as was Bernard Bosanquet (1848–1923) in preparing his lecture in Maracaibo. For information about the Theosophical Society, see Olav Hammer and Mikael Rothstein, eds., Handbook of the Theosophical Current, vol. 7, Brill Handbooks on Contemporary Religion (Boston: Brill, 2013). For information on the dynamics at play between science and the Theosophical Society, see Egil Asprem, “Theosophical Attitudes Towards Science: Past and Present,” in ibid., 405–28. Similar ideas are at play in Manuel de la Cruz’s writings and Mondrian’s essays. For the Dutch artist, “Art—although an end in itself, like religion—is the means through which we can know the universal and contemplate it in plastic form.”28Piet Mondrian, The New Art—The New Life: The Collected Writings of Piet Mondrian, ed. and trans. Harry Holtzman and Martin S. James (Boston: G. K. Hall, 1986), 42. Manuel de la Cruz, like Kandinsky, asserted that he was living at a watershed moment in history, a time when truths were revealed; art could help, he argued, to manifest that revelation.29 Spretnak, The Spiritual Dynamic in Modern Art, 86. With Neo-Plasticism, Mondrian himself foresaw a new culture “of the mature individual; once matured, the individual will be open to the universal and will tend more and more to unite with it.”30Mondrian, The New Art—The New Life, 35. Emphasis in original.

Through influences such as these, Manuel de la Cruz developed his own vision of a macro-history. He was interested in deciphering the mystery of time and the relative truth regarding the role of humankind in the cosmos—concerns he shared with esotericism.31Garry W. Trompf, “Macrohistory,” in Dictionary of Gnosis & Western Esotericism, ed. Wouter J. Hanegraaff with Antoine Faivre, Roelof van den Brock, and Jean-Pierre Brach (Leiden: Brill, 2006): 701. And these concerns also informed his conception of Neo-Plasticism. In his writings, he follows a narrative akin to that of a number of esoteric traditions in which “all things originate in one and all things in turn flow and return to one.”32Trompf, “Macrohistory,” 702. It is within this conceptual framework that Manuel de la Cruz forged his vision of art history. In his view, this history advanced toward cosmic truth and the repudiation of a certain sensual and superficial individualism whose final champion was Romanticism.33González, “El arte como integración cósmica,” 170. In 1961, Manuel de la Cruz González cofounded the artists’ collective Grupo 8. The important work of analyzing that group’s celebrated manifesto in relationship to Manuel de la Cruz’s theories will be left to future research. See Grupo 8, “Manifiesto,” in Brecha 5, no. 11 (July 1961): 25–26.

In closing, we might read Luisa’s art in the context of the historical progress posited by Manuel de la Cruz. Some strains of Romantic thinking resonate in her work, at least in terms of an aesthetic that expresses the spirituality innate to nature. Think of William Blake (English, 1757–1827) and Caspar David Friedrich (German, 1774–1840), for instance.34Her ideas are less akin, though, to certain Romantic ideas about the cosmic oneness of creation as constituted by nature. On the spiritual in 20th-century art, see Spretnak, The Spiritual Dynamic in Modern Art, 17–52; and Arthur McCalla, “Romanticism,” in Hanegraaff, Dictionary of Gnosis & Western Esotericism, 1000–7. The Romantics, like Luisa González de Sáenz, understood that the spiritual can be captured in its environment through the subjective, that is, through a personal vision. True knowledge—or the knowledge to which the individual can gain access—exists only in the subjective,35McCalla, “Romanticism,” 1002. an idea that aligns with Luisa’s perception of the possibility of seeing the world through the opening of the soul.

How to understand humankind in our environment and the universal principles that govern us were concerns shared by Manuel de la Cruz and Luisa. Their distinctive artistic and, perhaps, personal experiences led them to contrasting sets—or fabrics—of beliefs, practices, and systems as well as strategies. Manuel de la Cruz’s work engages the control and understanding of truths that can be materialized in an object, and Luisa’s the veiled nature of the spiritual that is, nonetheless, experienced and, therefore, potentially materialized in the object.


I am grateful to Gabriela Sáenz-Shelby, Valeria Mora López, and Leonardo Santamaría Montero for their comments on early drafts of this text. I would like to thank Sofía Vindas Solano and the Repositorio Centroamericano de Patrimonio Cultural for the information they provided on Luisa González de Sáenz and for access to primary sources relevant to her life and work. Lastly, I thank the Museo de Arte Costarricense and the Museos del Banco Central for allowing me to reproduce works from their collections.

Spanish

“La belleza cósmica no admite gradaciones o localizaciones geográficas o cronológicas, es infinita, mientras que las reacciones sensuales llevan aparejados los términos de bonito, feo, trágico, humorístico, útil, límites constantes en su fugaz carrera hacia la muerte”.36Manuel de la Cruz González, “El arte como integración cósmica (1957)” Escena. Revista de las artes, 74, no. 1 (2014): 168.

Con estas palabras, el artista costarricense Manuel de la Cruz González (1909–1986) determinaba la diferencia crucial entre un arte que conducía al infinito, ejemplificado en su caso por la abstracción, y un arte transitorio que respondía a emociones inmediatas, características que son más evidentes en el arte figurativo.37Sobre el arte de Manuel de la Cruz González, véase María Alejandra Triana, El arte como integración cósmica. Manuel de la Cruz González y la abstracción geométrica (San José: Fundación Museos del Banco Central, 2010). El artista conceptualizó el arte como una herramienta que generaba la integración del ser humano en la universalidad del cosmos, lo que daría como resultado la belleza cósmica. Esta cita forma parte de la conferencia impartida por Manuel de la Cruz en Maracaibo, Venezuela, en 1957, titulada “El arte como integración cósmica”, en la cual propuso sus teorías sobre el valor cósmico del arte abstracto geométrico. A lo largo de la década de 1950, el artista también dictará otras conferencias y escribirá ensayos al respecto, además de iniciar una producción de obras que reflejan sus preceptos teóricos y que culminaría a inicios de los años setenta.

Figura 1. Manuel de la Cruz González. Equilibrio Cósmico. Laca sobre madera. 1965. Museo de Arte Costarricense

En la misma década de 1950, otra artista costarricense iniciará una producción también vinculada a lo trascendente, pero, a diferencia de Manuel de la Cruz, no había en su trabajo una intención de integración en esa verdad universal, sino una aceptación de la imposibilidad de acceder a la realidad última del ser. Me refiero a Luisa González de Sáenz (1899–1982), cuyas pinturas, dibujos y vitrales se enfocaron, a partir de los años cincuenta y hasta el final de sus días, en un estilo donde el paisaje y la figura humana predominan, y las formas de expresión en la línea y la pincelada plasmaban una manera de percibir el entorno natural, el ser humano, y los aspectos espirituales imbuidos en ambos (fig. 2).38Sobre la obra de Luisa González de Sáenz, véase Carlos Francisco Echeverría, Una mirada risueña a lo terrible: Luisa González de Sáenz (San José: Universidad Veritas, 2010). También es valiosa la última retrospectiva de la artista en el Museo de Arte Costarricense, San José, que se inauguró el 24 de Noviembre del 2022 y terminó a finales de Marzo del 2023: https://www.mac.go.cr/es/exposicion/trascender-lo-terrenal-luisa-gonzalez-de-saenz Luisa trató las formas perceptibles proporcionadas por su entorno como los elementos en los que era posible sentir y ver lo trascendente.

Figura 2. Luisa González Feo de Sáenz. Sin título (montaña y lago). S.f. Óleo sobre tela adherida a cartón. Museos del Banco Central

En este ensayo me concentro en las propuestas sobre lo espiritual y lo trascendente propias de estos artistas, y en cómo sus obras revelan posturas predominantes en el siglo XX sobre el papel del arte en la representación y transformación de lo espiritual.39Como una breve introducción al tema, véase Charlene Spretnak, The Spiritual Dynamic in Modern Art: Art History Reconsidered, 1800 to the Present (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2014). En el caso de Manuel de la Cruz, veremos un entendimiento del arte y de su propia producción en cuanto componentes que evidencian las vibraciones adecuadas de una verdad universal irrefutable. El arte se convierte, además, en un artefacto que al ser comprendido bajo conceptos como la belleza cósmica, acerca al ser humano a su estado absoluto. En contraste, la obra de Luisa no acepta que el ser humano pueda conocer, en esta vida, una verdad última y, sin embargo, la artista tiene claro que el entorno natural y las personas están permeados de una carga espiritual, una cualidad inmanente tal, que lo vuelve capaz de modificar la percepción de las cosas. Su obra no es un artefacto para la integración, sino la materialización de un mundo espiritual imbuido de la cotidianeidad que nos rodea.

Manuel de la Cruz González y Luisa González de Sénz pertenecieron a la generación costarricense de artistas de los años treinta, fundamental para la introducción de las vanguardias artísticas al país.40Sobre la generación de los años treinta en Costa Rica, véase Eugenia Zavaleta, Las exposiciones de artes plásticas en Costa Rica (1928-1937) (San José: Editorial UCR, 2004). Hacia finales de la década de 1940, Manuel de la Cruz inició su incursión en el arte abstracto.41Fue, de hecho, uno de los pioneros del arte abstracto costarricense. Sobre la introducción del arte abstracto en Costa Rica, véase Eugenia Zavaleta, Los inicios del arte abstracto en Costa Rica, 1958-1971 (San José: Museo de Arte Costarricense, 1994). A inicios de los años cincuenta arribó a Venezuela y ahí, influido por el ambiente artístico del país y por el neoplasticismo, movimiento ampliamente divulgado por Piet Mondrian (neerlandés, 1872–1944), desarrolló sus teorías artísticas.42Esteban A. Calvo, “Manuel de la Cruz González, su noción de “arte cósmico”: la geometría, el color, la proporción y el concepto filosófico de creación,” Escena. Revista de las artes 72, no.2 (2014): 103. Luisa comenzó su carrera artística con pinturas de paisajes y el arte del retrato. Desde finales de los años cuarenta empezó a generar obras más herméticas, sirviéndose principalmente del paisaje natural de las zonas de altura. Su paleta de colores se volvió oscura y su estética sugería un escenario pictórico adverso y en movimiento, cuyo resultado plástico indica una cierta abstracción de los elementos naturales. La artista trató disímiles temas religiosos y míticos, y forjó, de manera casi obsesiva, escenas donde la naturaleza imperaba sobre los seres humanos. Si bien desarrolló su carrera artística en Costa Rica, podemos constatar, gracias a la colección de dibujos preservada por la familia Sáenz-Shelby, que los entornos naturales y ciudades que visitó en sus viajes a Estados Unidos y a Europa influyeron en ella, llevándola a realizar una gran cantidad de bocetos de esa temática que guardan una estrecha relación con la producción iniciada en la década de 1950.

En 1956, Manuel de la Cruz publica en la revista costarricense Brecha el ensayo “El arte abstracto: realidad de nuestro tiempo”. El artista entiende el arte abstracto como la “reafirmación de las eternas verdades estéticas”,43Manuel de la Cruz González, “El arte abstracto: realidad de nuestro tiempo” Brecha 1, no.1 (Septiembre 1956): 8. un arte universal que trasciende geografías. En la ya mencionada conferencia de 1957 en Maracaibo, el artista propone que el universo está comprendido en el número, el ritmo, el orden y el equilibrio; un cosmos eterno donde toda forma independiente al final está sujeta a una totalidad universal. La vida consiste en infinitas integraciones y reintegraciones de energía, y el espíritu humano se concibe como una conexión vibrante con este todo universal.44González, “El arte como integración cósmica,” 165. El arte es, en este contexto, “una manera de provocar determinadas reacciones que llamamos estéticas . . . [que] se dirigen a determinada porción de lo humano en inevitable búsqueda de vibraciones cósmicas afines, tomando el momento humano como puente hacia su integración universal”.45González, “El arte como integración cósmica,” 167. Estas ‘vibraciones cósmicas’ son lo emitido por el ritmo armónico que se expresa en las formas geométricas, líneas y colores empleados en la pintura, lo que posibilita el proceso de integración cósmica (fig. 3).

Figura 3. Manuel de la Cruz González. Abstracción Geométrica. Laca sobre madera. 1957. Museos del Banco Central

Manuel de la Cruz también establece tres vías artísticas para la integración: la espontánea, la intuitiva y la intelectual; y con ellas compone clasificaciones para una historia del arte, siendo el arte abstracto de la primera mitad del siglo XX la principal vía intelectual. Las vías se muestran a lo largo de la historia, y el arte contenido en ellas son referentes de la eternidad cósmica en la que estamos comprendidos.46González, “El arte como integración cósmica,” 168–69, 174–75. Manuel de la Cruz emplea la “necesidad interior”, proclamada por Vasily Kandinsky (Francés, nacido en Rusia, 1866–1944) en 1911 en Über das Geistige in der Kunst: Insbesondere in der Malerei (De lo espiritual en el arte, y la pintura en particular), para entender grandes acontecimientos históricos en el mundo de las artes y de la cultura. En su ensayo “El Cuadro Tridimensional”, publicado en 1958, Manuel de la Cruz nos dice que: “Fra Angelico interesa e interesará siempre, en su época o fuera de ella . . . no porque pintó ángeles, sino el cómo los pintó imbuyéndoles esa unión mística que es común a todos los hombres aún [sic] cuando ese fervor se canalice hacia Buda o Quezlcoatl [sic], vale decir, cómo manifestó su “necesidad interior.”47Manuel de la Cruz González, “El cuadro tridimensional,” Brecha 3, no.3 (Noviembre 1958): 8.

Manuel de la Cruz ve entonces la transición de un pensamiento primitivo a un pensamiento racional, y es en la última vía donde se puede plantear un camino hacia la verdad, “su razón cósmica, sus ritmos vitales, eternos y universales”.48González, “El arte como integración cósmica”, 169. El artista propone que a la obra de arte se le pueden suministrar las condiciones necesarias para alcanzar la integración cósmica. Esas condiciones están en gran medida representadas por Mondrian y Kandinsky (Figs. 4–5), ya que “ambos comprendieron que sólo por la abstracción, la eliminación de la referencia, de lo sensual y alegórico, el olvido en fin de todo lo romántico, es que podía llegarse al ritmo infinito”.49Manuel de la Cruz aquí hace alusión al Romanticismo, que como veremos brevemente más adelante, es un movimiento que funcionó como parámetro y contraposición al proyecto abstracto modernista. González, “El arte como integración cósmica”, 170.

Figura 4. Piet Mondrian. Composition in Oval with Color Planes 1. 1914. Óleo sobre lienzo. 42 3/8 x 31″ (107.6 x 78.8 cm. Adquirido por compra. © The Museum of Modern Art
Figura 5. Vasily Kandinsky. Watercolor No. 13 (Aquarell no. 13). 1913. Acuarela, tinta y lápiz sobre papel 12 5/8 x 16″ (32.1 x 40.6 cm). Donación de Katherine S. Dreier. © 2024 Artists Rights Society (ARS), Nueva York / ADAGP, París. The Museum of Modern Art

Cuando observamos la pintura abstracto-geométrica de Manuel de la Cruz en el contexto de estos ensayos, advertimos el compromiso con la noción de universalidad. En su cuadro Abstracción Geométrica Nº 8 (fig. 6), por ejemplo, encontramos plastas planas de color que interactúan con líneas horizontales, verticales y diagonales, además de sencillas formas geométricas. El artista también se sirvió de leves curvaturas de la línea que generaban tensión entre los colores y las formas seleccionadas, tal y como puede verse en Equilibrio cósmico.50De esta forma Manuel de la Cruz participaba del gran proyecto artístico vinculado a la universalidad, del que otros artistas latinoamericanos también expusieron sus propuestas. Un caso ejemplar es el de Joaquín Torres-García (uruguayo, 1874–1949), quien propuso el universalismo constructivo y que hizo uso indiscriminado de signos y figuras propios de diversas culturas, tales como la apropiación de elementos indígenas y precolombinos.

Figura 6. Manuel de la Cruz González. Abstracción Geométrica No.8. C. 1957. Óleo sobre tela. Museos del Banco Central

Luisa González de Sáenz, a diferencia de Manuel de la Cruz González, no dejó escritos sistemáticos sobre su modo de visualizar el arte. Lo que conocemos de ella son breves entrevistas que le realizaron, comentarios a sus obras de críticos de arte a lo largo de los años, así como los testimonios de familiares y amigos de la artista. En otras palabras, Luisa sería reservada respecto de los procesos existentes detrás de su obra. El interés se dirigía en cambio a cómo el arte se convertía en un medio diario de expresión: cuando este era expuesto al público, lo que se mostraba era su percepción sobre el entorno, lo espiritual y la humanidad.51Resulta sugestivo el interés de Luisa por representar temas espirituales en su obra, ya que justo encontramos varias artistas mujeres que recurrieron a tópicos similares, tales como Leonora Carrington (británica, 1917–2011), Remedios Varo (española, 1908–1963), Agnes Pelton (estadounidense, nacida en Alemania, 1881–1961), Wanda Gag (estadounidense, 1893–1946) y Rosaleen Norton (australiana, 1917–1979). Aunque este ensayo no es el espacio para ahondar en ello, esta afinidad con lo producido por Luisa en Costa Rica merece, a futuro, una mayor discusión. En la Figura 7 vemos, por ejemplo, el potencial que le dio la artista al paisaje, su inmensidad y su espiritualidad, con respecto al solitario individuo, de quien Luisa nos deja conocer el camino que ha recorrido. El cielo nocturno se transforma en lo que podemos dilucidar, es una criatura voladora en movimiento, como si estuviese atravesando o surgiendo de la noche misma.

Figura 7. Luisa González Feo de Sáenz. Sin título. S.f. Dibujo (tinta) sobre papel. Museos del Banco Central

Luisa encontró una base para la creación en el arte figurativo, al cual consideraba su “mejor forma de expresión, y como en arte y en toda manifestación se debe buscar la verdad, ésta es mi verdad”.52Luisa González de Sáenz,  citada en “El arte del vitral en doña Luisa González de Sáenz,” por Norma Loaiza, La Nación 24, no. 7820(Octubre 9, 1970): 53. El paisaje de altura, entre otros, le suministró esos componentes para una expresión personal, tales como la forma de los árboles, la niebla, la fuerza del viento y la temperatura.La artista sentía que la imposibilidad de percibir la naturaleza de forma distinta por parte de las personas era un impedimento causado por la falta de apertura del espíritu a otro tipo de sensaciones.53Juan Carlos Flores, “Luisa Gonzáles: todos vivimos en la irrealidad,” Semanario Universidad, no.404 (Agosto 17, 1979): 11. La sociedad no se permitía explorar las posibilidades de la mirada que únicamente un espíritu abierto podía proveer. En este sentido, la obra de Luisa se involucró gradualmente no sólo en lo que se observa a partir de esta mirada espiritual, sino también en lo que se transforma espiritualmente en el ser humano y en la naturaleza. Como la artista comenta en una grabación que aparece en el documental de Carlos Freer, Una tarde de ella misma: Retrato de doña Luisa González de Sáenz, realizado en 1999: “No sé si hay un cambio espiritual, que generalmente todos tenemos, ¿verdad? Hay ciertas evoluciones que sin darse uno mucho cuenta va[n] transformando el espíritu, ¿verdad? Me fui interesando tanto, y ver en la naturaleza tanto [como] en las mismas personas, el alma humana.”54González, citada en Freer, Una tarde de ella misma.

Luisa poseía la capacidad, de acuerdo con el escritor costarricense Abelardo Bonilla (1898–1969), de “materializar lo espiritual, hasta hacerlo visible y nuestro; espiritualizar lo material hasta hacerlo impalpable, que es también hacerlo nuestro.”55Abelardo Bonilla en “Agenda Luisa González Feo” (s.f. nota de 1934). La agenda pertenece a la familia Saénz-Shelby y se puede consultar por medio del Repositorio Centroamericano de Patrimonio Cultural: https://repositorio.iiarte.ucr.ac.cr/handle/123456789/15533. Interesantemente, Bonilla dice esto de Luisa hacia 1934, aunque no conocemos mucha obra de esa época cuyos temas sean los discutidos aquí y, sin embargo, el cumplido de Bonilla pareciera profetizar aquello que Luisa empieza a exponer a partir de los años cincuenta. La artista ofrecía una especie de transfiguración de la naturaleza observada, a través de un estilo en el que tanto la pincelada como la línea de dibujo eran fuertes y generaban una atmósfera integrada, adversa y en movimiento, al punto de generar cierta abstracción y falta de claridad entre los elementos representados. Esto se puede advertir en una ilustración que realiza para el cuento “María de la Soledad: Episodio en la vida del doctor Lunático”, escrito por su hermano Mario González Feo (fig.8). El dibujo refiere a dos líneas del personaje principal: “ojalá pudiera sentir ahora la fuerza vital de aquella tarde transfigurada. ¡Porque toda la tarde estaba transfigurada!”.56Mario González, María de la Soledad y otras narraciones (San José: Imprenta Trejos Hermanos, 1967): 24. El texto que precede estas oraciones resulta a su vez valioso: “hay cosas y personas que en un momento dado, por la fuerza extraordinaria de lo que llamamos misterio, se transfiguran. Siguen siendo ellas pero una como luz interior, una llama interna . . . les da iluminación, transparencia interior: eso es, transfiguración”.57González, María de la Soledad, 24. La imagen muestra una figura situada en un paisaje desolado y su cuerpo se está integrando con el espacio natural, específicamente con los rayos de la “luz” que está en el cielo. Podemos distinguir entre el terreno sobre el que está la figura y el cielo, y también la tensión entre esta fuente lumínica y la figura. Al mismo tiempo, el trazo posibilita la sensación de movilidad y adversidad en cada uno de los elementos mencionados.

Figura 8. Luisa González Feo de Sáenz. Ilustración para “María de la Soledad: Episodio en la vida del Doctor Lunático”. 1967. Impresión de dibujo (tinta) sobre papel. González, Mario. María de la Soledad y otras narraciones. San José: Imprenta Trejos Hermanos. 1967. Imagen extraída de ejemplar de la Biblioteca Carlos Monge Alfaro, Universidad de Costa Rica

La observación y la expresión de lo espiritualmente percibido son actos individuales. Esto daba pie a un pensamiento recurrente en la obra y en la vida de la artista: la inevitable e inherente soledad del alma, que no es posible eliminar aun estando en compañía de otros.58Luisa González de Sáenz, citada en Flores Zúñiga, “Luisa González”, 11. Nos encontramos con paisajes donde la gran mayoría de las figuras humanas transitan en soledad, y si es que hay varios personajes, estos no se percatan los unos de los otros.Por otro lado, aunado a las transformaciones espirituales y el peregrinaje solitario, la aceptación de la imposibilidad de conocer la verdadera cara de la trascendencia, de una vida después de la muerte, permeó su obra.

Luisa profesaba, por ejemplo, un gran cariño por los Rubaiyat, cuartetos atribuidos a Omar Khayyam (persa, 1048–1131), y realizó dibujos referentes a algunos de sus pasajes. En los Rubaiyat es valioso el goce inmediato de la vida, ya que no hay conocimiento humano capaz de darnos las respuestas a las preguntas fundamentales de la humanidad: los motivos detrás de la vida y la muerte. Un dibujo de Luisa, donde se ilustra el cuarteto LXVIII de los Rubaiyat,refleja estas ideas (fig. 9): “No somos más que una hilera en movimiento / De sombras mágicas que van y vienen / En torno a la linterna iluminada por el sol / Y sostenida a medianoche por el Maestro del Espectáculo”.59Edward FitzGerald, Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám, the astronomer-poet of Persia (San Francisco: The Reader’s Library, 1891): 34: “We are no other than a moving row / Of Magic Shadow-shapes that come and go / Round with the Sun-illumined Lantern held / In Midnight by the Master of the Show”. Salvo que se indique lo contrario, todas las traducciones al español son mías. La artista vuelve a emplear la luz como elemento que transfigura el espacio. Debido a la fuerza del trazo, la artista posibilita la sensación de que nos hallamos ante la inevitable transformación, o transitoriedad, tanto de los individuos como de la naturaleza. Contamos también con un boceto en el que está anotado un fragmento del cuarteto XXXII (fig. 10) sobre aquellos sitios del conocimiento a los cuales el ser humano no puede ingresar: “¡De esa puerta la llave no encontré yo jamás; ese velo ocultaba lo que existe detrás…!”.60FitzGerald, Rubáiyát, 25: “There was the Door to which I found no Key; / There was the Veil through which I could not see”. A diferencia de otros ejemplos que hemos expuesto, el tema se representa en un estilo más sobrio. Ante un espacio nocturno y desolado se encuentra un camino que se dirige a una puerta, la cual resguarda aquello trascendente a lo que el ser humano no puede acceder. Los tres personajes caminan hacia la puerta, iluminados sólo por sus lámparas, con sus rostros y cuerpos cubiertos. Ni dichos personajes ni nadie posee la llave que permite ingresar a dicho espacio del saber.

Figura 9. Luisa González Feo de Sáenz. Sin título. S.f. Dibujo (tinta) sobre papel. Álbum de bocetos de Luisa González. Colección Sáenz Shelby. Imagen proveída por el Repositorio Centroamericano de Patrimonio Cultural
Imagen 10. Luisa González Feo de Sáenz. Boceto: la puerta cerrada. S.f. Dibujo. Colección Sáenz Shelby. Imagen proveída por el Repositorio Centroamericano de Patrimonio Cultural

El uso de los Rubaiyat nos permite suponer que varios elementos de la obra de Luisa se vieron influidos por referencias literarias o filosóficas, aunque no sea fácil establecer cuáles fueron. Y es que, como ha sido señalado antes, no hizo pública esta información. Al reconstruir parte de la forma en que Luisa entendió su obra, podríamos decir que la artista estaba consciente de un mundo espiritual que el alma humana era capaz de percibir, tanto en ella misma como en el entorno natural en el que se desenvolvía. Esta interacción provoca la transformación constante del alma y de la naturaleza, y dicho proceso espiritual constituía una experiencia individual que se vivía, a lo largo de la existencia, en soledad. Luisa expresó su sentir por vía de una obra donde se pudiese visualizar precisamente esta interacción y transformación entre el individuo y su entorno. Al mismo tiempo, estaba consciente de que ese era el límite de su experiencia y que cualquier otro aspecto sobre lo trascendente, en especial lo concerniente a la vida después de la muerte, quedaba resguardado en el misterio.

Manuel de la Cruz, en cambio, se interesó en que supiéramos cuáles eran las referencias de su programa artístico: desde una especie de espíritu hegeliano sobre la historia y una fidelidad a la ciencia hasta las teorías estéticas y espirituales de artistas abstractos modernos que, dicho sea de paso, estaban influenciados por la Sociedad Teosófica, la cual proporcionaba su propia postura sobre los avances científicos.61La influencia de autores hegelianos se evidencia, por ejemplo, en el uso de autores como Benedetto Croce (1866–1952) para su ensayo “El arte abstracto . . .” de 1956 y Bernard Bosanquet (1848–1923) para su conferencia en Maracaibo. Sobre un conocimiento general relativo a la Sociedad Teosófica, véase Olav Hammer & Mikael Rothstein (eds.), Handbook of the Theosophical Current (Boston & Leiden: Brill, 2013). Sobre las dinámicas entre la ciencia y la Sociedad Teosófica, véase Egil Asprem, “Theosophical Attitudes Towards Science: Past and Present,” en Hammer and Rothstein, Handbook of the Theosophical Current, 405–28. Cuando comparamos los escritos de Manuel de la Cruz con los ensayos de Mondrian, por ejemplo, encontramos propuestas similares entre sí. Para el artista neerlandés, “el arte –aunque sea un fin en sí mismo, como la religión– es el medio a través del cual podemos conocer lo universal y contemplarlo de forma plástica”.62Piet Mondrian, The New Art—The New Life: The Collected Writings of Piet Mondrian, ed. and trans. Harry Holtzman and Martin S. James (Boston: G. K. Hall, 1986), 42: “Art –although an end in itself, like religion– is the means through which we can know the universal and contemplate it in plastic form.” Manuel de la Cruz replicó, además, un sentir similar al de Kandinsky: decía estar viviendo en un momento decisivo de la historia, en el cual las verdades se estaban revelando y su arte podía ayudar a manifestar dicha revelación.63Spretnak, The Spiritual Dynamic in Modern Art, 86. El mismo Mondrian con el neoplasticismo profetizaba el desarrollo paralelo de una nueva cultura, que sería “aquella del individuo maduro; una vez maduro, el individuo estará abierto a lo universal y tenderá más y más a unirse con ello”.64Mondrian, The New Art – The New Life, 35. “That of the mature individual; once matured, the individual will be open to the universal and will tend more and more to unite with it”.

Con este tipo de referentes Manuel de la Cruz generó su propia versión de una macrohistoria, manifiesta en esa preocupación común con el esoterismo por descifrar el misterio del tiempo y la verdad relativa al papel del ser humano en el cosmos.65Garry W. Trompf., “Macrohistory,” in Dictionary of Gnosis & Western Esotericism, ed. Wouter J. Hanegraaff (Leiden & Boston: Brill, 2006): 701. Su concepción del arte neoplástico no está exenta de esto, ya que como leemos en sus escritos, se sigue una narrativa similar a la de varias tradiciones esotéricas, donde “todas las cosas se originan en uno y todas las cosas a su vez fluyen y vuelven a uno”.66Trompf, “Macrohistory”, 702: “All things originate in one and all things in turn flow and return to one”. Es en este contexto que Manuel de la Cruz forjó una visión peculiar del progreso en la historia del arte, en la que, a través de las épocas, hay una cercanía a la verdad cósmica y un rechazo ante cierto individualismo, sensual y superficial, cuyo último gran campeón fue el Romanticismo.67González, “El arte como integración cósmica”, 170. En 1961, Manuel de la Cruz contribuiría con la creación de un colectivo artístico llamado Grupo 8. Sería importante, para futuras investigaciones, analizar el famoso manifiesto del Grupo 8 a la luz de las teorías artísticas de Manuel de la Cruz. Véase Grupo 8, “Manifiesto,” in Brecha 5, no.11 (julio 1961): 25-26.

Podríamos finalizar con una lectura de la obra de Luisa en el contexto de este supuesto progreso sugerido por Manuel de la Cruz. Su producción artística guarda un cierto eco con algunas líneas de pensamiento del Romanticismo, por lo menos en lo que refiere a una cierta estética donde se expresaba lo espiritual inherente a la naturaleza, como lo sería en el caso de William Blake (inglés, 1757–1827) o de Caspar David Friedrich (alemán, 1774–1840).68La podemos distanciar, sin embargo, de ciertas ideas románticas relativas a la unidad cósmica de la creación que la naturaleza llegó a constituir. Sobre lo espiritual en el arte en el siglo XIX, véase Spretnak, The Spiritual Dynamic in Modern Art, 17–52);y Arthur McCalla, “Romanticism,” in Dictionary of Gnosis & Western Esotericism, ed. Wouter J. Hanegraaff (Leiden & Boston: Brill, 2006): 1000-1007. Los románticos, al igual que Luisa González de Sáenz, entendieron que la forma de preservar lo espiritual en su entorno se produce a través de lo subjetivo, esto es, una visión personal de lo espiritual. Es en lo subjetivo, de hecho, que el verdadero conocimiento existe, y al que en verdad el individuo puede acudir.69McCalla, “Romanticism”, 1002. Esta idea se alinea con la percepción que tuvo Luisa sobre la posibilidad de ver el mundo a partir de la apertura del alma.

Tanto Manuel como Luisa tuvieron inquietudes sobre cómo comprender al ser humano en su entorno y sobre los principios universales que nos gobiernan. Los problemas artísticos y, en todo caso, personales que surgieron, los llevaron a un entramado de creencias, prácticas y sistemas, y a soluciones plásticas contrastantes. Las obras artísticas de ambos responden, para el primero, al control y entendimiento de las verdades que se pueden materializar en un objeto y, para la segunda, a la veladura inherente a aquello espiritual que, sin embargo, es experimentado y, por lo tanto, también se puede materializar en el objeto.


Agradezco a Gabriela Sáenz-Shelby, Valeria Mora López y Leonardo Santamaría Montero, por sus comentarios y críticas al revisar los primeros bocetos de este texto. Quiero también agradecer a Sofía Vindas Solano y al Repositorio Centroamericano de Patrimonio Cultural por su apoyo en proporcionarme información y acceso a diversas fuentes relativas a Luisa González de Sáenz. Finalmente, va mi agradecimiento al Museo de Arte Costarricense y a los Museos del Banco Central por el permiso de reproducción de sus obras.


  • 1
    Manuel de la Cruz González, “El arte como integración cósmica” [1957], Escena: Revista de las artes, 74, no. 1 (2014): 168: “La belleza cósmica no admite gradaciones o localizaciones geográficas o cronológicas, es infinita, mientras que las reacciones sensuales llevan aparejados los términos de bonito, feo, trágico, humorístico, útil, límites constantes en su fugaz carrera hacia la Muerte.” Unless otherwise noted, all translations are mine.
  • 2
    On the art of Manuel de la Cruz González, see María Alejandra Triana, El arte como integración cósmica: Manuel de la Cruz González y la abstracción geométrica (San José: Fundación Museos del Banco Central, 2010).
  • 3
    On the work of Luisa González de Sáenz, see Carlos Francisco Echeverría, Una mirada risueña a lo terrible: Luisa González de Sáenz (San José: Universidad Veritas, 2010); see also the most recent retrospective of the artist’s work, Luisa González de Sáenz: Trascender lo terrenal (Luisa González de Sáenz: Transcending the Earthly), Museo de Arte Costarricense, San José, November 24, 2022–March 31, 2023, https://www.mac.go.cr/es/exposicion/trascender-lo-terrenal-luisa-gonzalez-de-saenz
  • 4
    For a brief introduction to this question, see Charlene Spretnak, The Spiritual Dynamic in Modern Art: Art History Reconsidered, 1800 to the Present (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2014).
  • 5
    On the 1930s generation of artists in Costa Rica, see Eugenia Zavaleta O., Las exposiciones de artes plásticas en Costa Rica (1928–1937) (San José: Editorial UCR, 2004).
  • 6
    He was, in fact, a pioneer of abstract art in Costa Rica. On early abstraction in Costa Rica, see Eugenia Zavaleta O., Los inicios del arte abstracto en Costa Rica, 1958–1971 (San José: Museo de Arte Costarricense, 1994).
  • 7
    Esteban A. Calvo, “Manuel de la Cruz González, su noción de ‘arte cósmico’: La geometría, el color, la proporción y el concepto filosófico de creación,” Escena: Revista de las artes 72, no. 2 (2014): 103.
  • 8
    Manuel de la Cruz González, “El arte abstracto: Realidad de nuestro tiempo,” Brecha 1, no. 1 (September 1956): 8: “reafirmación de las eternas verdades estéticas.”
  • 9
    González, “El arte como integración cósmica,” 165.
  • 10
    González, “El arte como integración cósmica,” 167: “una manera de provocar determinadas reacciones que llamamos estéticas . . . [que] se dirigen a determinada porción de lo humano en inevitable búsqueda de vibraciones cósmicas afines, tomando el momento humano como puente hacia su integración universal.”
  • 11
    González, “El arte como integración cósmica,” 168–69, 174–75.
  • 12
    Manuel de la Cruz González, “El cuadro tridimensional,” Brecha 3, no. 3 (November 1958): 8: “Fran Angelico interesa e interesará siempre, en su época o fuera de ella . . . no porque pintó ángeles, sino el cómo los pintó inbuyéndoles esa unión mística que es común a todos los hombres aún [sic] cuando ese fervor se canalice hacia Buda o Quezlcoatl [sic], vale decir, cómo manifestó su ‘necesidad interior.’”
  • 13
    González, “El arte como integración cósmica,” 169: “su razón cósmica, sus ritmos vitales, eternos y universales.”
  • 14
    Manuel de la Cruz González refers here to Romanticism, the movement that, as we shall see shortly, acted as a parameter for and counterpoint to the modern abstraction project. González, “El arte como integración cósmica,” 170: “ambos comprendieron que sólo por la abstracción, la eliminación de la referencia, de lo sensual y alegórico, el olvido en fin de todo lo romántico, es que podía llegarse al ritmo infinito.”
  • 15
    Manuel de la Cruz thus formed part of the great artistic project revolving around universality. Other artists throughout Latin America also took part, among them Joaquín Torres-García (Uruguayan, 1874–1949). Torres-García’s constructive universalism made indiscriminate use of signs and figures from different cultures, including from Indigenous and pre-Columbian civilizations.
  • 16
    Luisa was one of several women artists who incorporated spiritual themes. Others include Leonora Carrington (British, 1917–2011), Remedios Varo (Spanish, 1908–1963), Agnes Pelton (American, born Germany. 1881–1961), Wanda Gág (American, 1893–1946), and Rosaleen Norton (Australian, 1917–1979). While it is beyond the scope of this essay, the affinity between the work of these artists and Luisa’s production in Costa Rica merits further study.
  • 17
    Luisa González de Sáenz, quoted in “El arte del vitral en doña Luisa González de Sáenz,” by Norma Loaiza, La Nación 24, no. 7820(October 9, 1970): 53: “mejor forma de expresión, y como en arte y en toda manifestación se debe buscar la verdad, ésta es mi verdad.”
  • 18
    Una tarde de ella misma: Retrato de doña Luisa González de Sáenz, directed by Carlos Freer(San José: Centro Gandhi de Comunicación, Universidad para la Paz, Museo de Arte Costarricense, 1999), video recording. A DVD-format copy of this documentary is held at the Universidad Nacional de Costa Rica. The quality of the recording is poor, but the content of the video is conveyed.
  • 19
    Juan Carlos Flores, “Luisa Gonzáles: Todos vivimos en la irrealidad,” Semanario Universidad, no. 404 (August 17, 1979): 11.
  • 20
    González, quoted in Freer, Una tarde de ella misma: “No sé si hay un cambio espiritual, que generalmente todos tenemos, ¿verdad? Hay ciertas evoluciones que sin darse uno cuenta va[n] transformando el espíritu, ¿verdad? Me fui interesando tanto, y ver en la naturaleza tanto [como] en las mismas personas, el alma humana.”
  • 21
    Abelardo Bonilla, “Agenda Luisa González Feo” [undated note from 1934]: “materializar lo espiritual, hasta hacerlo visible y nuestro; espiritualizar lo material hasta hacerlo impalpable, que es también hacerlo nuestro.” The agenda, which belongs to the Saénz-Shelby family, is held in the Repositorio Centroamericano de Patrimonio Cultural, Instituto de Investigación en Arte, Universidad de Costa Rica, https://repositorio.iiarte.ucr.ac.cr/handle/123456789/15533. Bonilla’s statement about Luisa González de Sáenz’s work is from 1934, which is striking. There is little known work by her from this time on the themes discussed here, and yet Bonilla’s words seem to foretell what would become patent in her art starting in the fifties.
  • 22
    Mario González, María de la Soledad y otras narraciones (San José: Imprenta Trejos Hermanos, 1967), 24: “ojalá pudiera sentir ahora la fuerza vital de aquella tarde transfigurada. ¡Porque toda la tarde estaba transfigurada!”
  • 23
    González, María de la Soledad, 24: “hay cosas y personas que en un momento dado, por la fuerza extraordinaria de lo que llamamos misterio, se transfiguran. Siguen siendo ellas pero una como luz interior, una llama interna . . . les da iluminación, transparencia interior: eso es, transfiguración.”
  • 24
    Luisa González de Sáenz, quoted in Flores Zúñiga, “Luisa González,” 11.
  • 25
    Edward FitzGerald, trans. and ed., Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám: The Astronomer-Poet of Persia (1859; San Francisco: Reader’s Library, 1891): 34.
  • 26
    FitzGerald, Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám, 25. Original text from Luisa’s sketch: “¡De esa puerta la llave no encontré yo jamás; ese velo ocultaba lo que existe detrás . . . !”
  • 27
    Benedetto Croce (1866–1952) was among the Hegelians Manuel de la Cruz looked to in, for instance, in writing his 1956 essay “El arte abstracto . . .,” as was Bernard Bosanquet (1848–1923) in preparing his lecture in Maracaibo. For information about the Theosophical Society, see Olav Hammer and Mikael Rothstein, eds., Handbook of the Theosophical Current, vol. 7, Brill Handbooks on Contemporary Religion (Boston: Brill, 2013). For information on the dynamics at play between science and the Theosophical Society, see Egil Asprem, “Theosophical Attitudes Towards Science: Past and Present,” in ibid., 405–28.
  • 28
    Piet Mondrian, The New Art—The New Life: The Collected Writings of Piet Mondrian, ed. and trans. Harry Holtzman and Martin S. James (Boston: G. K. Hall, 1986), 42.
  • 29
    Spretnak, The Spiritual Dynamic in Modern Art, 86.
  • 30
    Mondrian, The New Art—The New Life, 35. Emphasis in original.
  • 31
    Garry W. Trompf, “Macrohistory,” in Dictionary of Gnosis & Western Esotericism, ed. Wouter J. Hanegraaff with Antoine Faivre, Roelof van den Brock, and Jean-Pierre Brach (Leiden: Brill, 2006): 701.
  • 32
    Trompf, “Macrohistory,” 702.
  • 33
    González, “El arte como integración cósmica,” 170. In 1961, Manuel de la Cruz González cofounded the artists’ collective Grupo 8. The important work of analyzing that group’s celebrated manifesto in relationship to Manuel de la Cruz’s theories will be left to future research. See Grupo 8, “Manifiesto,” in Brecha 5, no. 11 (July 1961): 25–26.
  • 34
    Her ideas are less akin, though, to certain Romantic ideas about the cosmic oneness of creation as constituted by nature. On the spiritual in 20th-century art, see Spretnak, The Spiritual Dynamic in Modern Art, 17–52; and Arthur McCalla, “Romanticism,” in Hanegraaff, Dictionary of Gnosis & Western Esotericism, 1000–7.
  • 35
    McCalla, “Romanticism,” 1002.
  • 36
    Manuel de la Cruz González, “El arte como integración cósmica (1957)” Escena. Revista de las artes, 74, no. 1 (2014): 168.
  • 37
    Sobre el arte de Manuel de la Cruz González, véase María Alejandra Triana, El arte como integración cósmica. Manuel de la Cruz González y la abstracción geométrica (San José: Fundación Museos del Banco Central, 2010).
  • 38
    Sobre la obra de Luisa González de Sáenz, véase Carlos Francisco Echeverría, Una mirada risueña a lo terrible: Luisa González de Sáenz (San José: Universidad Veritas, 2010). También es valiosa la última retrospectiva de la artista en el Museo de Arte Costarricense, San José, que se inauguró el 24 de Noviembre del 2022 y terminó a finales de Marzo del 2023: https://www.mac.go.cr/es/exposicion/trascender-lo-terrenal-luisa-gonzalez-de-saenz
  • 39
    Como una breve introducción al tema, véase Charlene Spretnak, The Spiritual Dynamic in Modern Art: Art History Reconsidered, 1800 to the Present (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2014).
  • 40
    Sobre la generación de los años treinta en Costa Rica, véase Eugenia Zavaleta, Las exposiciones de artes plásticas en Costa Rica (1928-1937) (San José: Editorial UCR, 2004).
  • 41
    Fue, de hecho, uno de los pioneros del arte abstracto costarricense. Sobre la introducción del arte abstracto en Costa Rica, véase Eugenia Zavaleta, Los inicios del arte abstracto en Costa Rica, 1958-1971 (San José: Museo de Arte Costarricense, 1994).
  • 42
    Esteban A. Calvo, “Manuel de la Cruz González, su noción de “arte cósmico”: la geometría, el color, la proporción y el concepto filosófico de creación,” Escena. Revista de las artes 72, no.2 (2014): 103.
  • 43
    Manuel de la Cruz González, “El arte abstracto: realidad de nuestro tiempo” Brecha 1, no.1 (Septiembre 1956): 8.
  • 44
    González, “El arte como integración cósmica,” 165.
  • 45
    González, “El arte como integración cósmica,” 167.
  • 46
    González, “El arte como integración cósmica,” 168–69, 174–75.
  • 47
    Manuel de la Cruz González, “El cuadro tridimensional,” Brecha 3, no.3 (Noviembre 1958): 8.
  • 48
    González, “El arte como integración cósmica”, 169.
  • 49
    Manuel de la Cruz aquí hace alusión al Romanticismo, que como veremos brevemente más adelante, es un movimiento que funcionó como parámetro y contraposición al proyecto abstracto modernista. González, “El arte como integración cósmica”, 170.
  • 50
    De esta forma Manuel de la Cruz participaba del gran proyecto artístico vinculado a la universalidad, del que otros artistas latinoamericanos también expusieron sus propuestas. Un caso ejemplar es el de Joaquín Torres-García (uruguayo, 1874–1949), quien propuso el universalismo constructivo y que hizo uso indiscriminado de signos y figuras propios de diversas culturas, tales como la apropiación de elementos indígenas y precolombinos.
  • 51
    Resulta sugestivo el interés de Luisa por representar temas espirituales en su obra, ya que justo encontramos varias artistas mujeres que recurrieron a tópicos similares, tales como Leonora Carrington (británica, 1917–2011), Remedios Varo (española, 1908–1963), Agnes Pelton (estadounidense, nacida en Alemania, 1881–1961), Wanda Gag (estadounidense, 1893–1946) y Rosaleen Norton (australiana, 1917–1979). Aunque este ensayo no es el espacio para ahondar en ello, esta afinidad con lo producido por Luisa en Costa Rica merece, a futuro, una mayor discusión.
  • 52
    Luisa González de Sáenz,  citada en “El arte del vitral en doña Luisa González de Sáenz,” por Norma Loaiza, La Nación 24, no. 7820(Octubre 9, 1970): 53.
  • 53
    Juan Carlos Flores, “Luisa Gonzáles: todos vivimos en la irrealidad,” Semanario Universidad, no.404 (Agosto 17, 1979): 11.
  • 54
    González, citada en Freer, Una tarde de ella misma.
  • 55
    Abelardo Bonilla en “Agenda Luisa González Feo” (s.f. nota de 1934). La agenda pertenece a la familia Saénz-Shelby y se puede consultar por medio del Repositorio Centroamericano de Patrimonio Cultural: https://repositorio.iiarte.ucr.ac.cr/handle/123456789/15533. Interesantemente, Bonilla dice esto de Luisa hacia 1934, aunque no conocemos mucha obra de esa época cuyos temas sean los discutidos aquí y, sin embargo, el cumplido de Bonilla pareciera profetizar aquello que Luisa empieza a exponer a partir de los años cincuenta.
  • 56
    Mario González, María de la Soledad y otras narraciones (San José: Imprenta Trejos Hermanos, 1967): 24.
  • 57
    González, María de la Soledad, 24.
  • 58
    Luisa González de Sáenz, citada en Flores Zúñiga, “Luisa González”, 11.
  • 59
    Edward FitzGerald, Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám, the astronomer-poet of Persia (San Francisco: The Reader’s Library, 1891): 34: “We are no other than a moving row / Of Magic Shadow-shapes that come and go / Round with the Sun-illumined Lantern held / In Midnight by the Master of the Show”. Salvo que se indique lo contrario, todas las traducciones al español son mías.
  • 60
    FitzGerald, Rubáiyát, 25: “There was the Door to which I found no Key; / There was the Veil through which I could not see”.
  • 61
    La influencia de autores hegelianos se evidencia, por ejemplo, en el uso de autores como Benedetto Croce (1866–1952) para su ensayo “El arte abstracto . . .” de 1956 y Bernard Bosanquet (1848–1923) para su conferencia en Maracaibo. Sobre un conocimiento general relativo a la Sociedad Teosófica, véase Olav Hammer & Mikael Rothstein (eds.), Handbook of the Theosophical Current (Boston & Leiden: Brill, 2013). Sobre las dinámicas entre la ciencia y la Sociedad Teosófica, véase Egil Asprem, “Theosophical Attitudes Towards Science: Past and Present,” en Hammer and Rothstein, Handbook of the Theosophical Current, 405–28.
  • 62
    Piet Mondrian, The New Art—The New Life: The Collected Writings of Piet Mondrian, ed. and trans. Harry Holtzman and Martin S. James (Boston: G. K. Hall, 1986), 42: “Art –although an end in itself, like religion– is the means through which we can know the universal and contemplate it in plastic form.”
  • 63
    Spretnak, The Spiritual Dynamic in Modern Art, 86.
  • 64
    Mondrian, The New Art – The New Life, 35. “That of the mature individual; once matured, the individual will be open to the universal and will tend more and more to unite with it”.
  • 65
    Garry W. Trompf., “Macrohistory,” in Dictionary of Gnosis & Western Esotericism, ed. Wouter J. Hanegraaff (Leiden & Boston: Brill, 2006): 701.
  • 66
    Trompf, “Macrohistory”, 702: “All things originate in one and all things in turn flow and return to one”.
  • 67
    González, “El arte como integración cósmica”, 170. En 1961, Manuel de la Cruz contribuiría con la creación de un colectivo artístico llamado Grupo 8. Sería importante, para futuras investigaciones, analizar el famoso manifiesto del Grupo 8 a la luz de las teorías artísticas de Manuel de la Cruz. Véase Grupo 8, “Manifiesto,” in Brecha 5, no.11 (julio 1961): 25-26.
  • 68
    La podemos distanciar, sin embargo, de ciertas ideas románticas relativas a la unidad cósmica de la creación que la naturaleza llegó a constituir. Sobre lo espiritual en el arte en el siglo XIX, véase Spretnak, The Spiritual Dynamic in Modern Art, 17–52);y Arthur McCalla, “Romanticism,” in Dictionary of Gnosis & Western Esotericism, ed. Wouter J. Hanegraaff (Leiden & Boston: Brill, 2006): 1000-1007.
  • 69
    McCalla, “Romanticism”, 1002.

More in this theme

Materiality Against the Grain: Conspiratorial Materialisms and Afro-Diasporic Arsenal / Materialidad a contrapelo: materialismo conspiratorio y arsenal afrodiaspórico

On Conspiratorial Materialisms Firearms, Molotov cocktails, flags, and banners are some of the objects in an arsenal of protests and revolts. Alongside clenched fists and enraged bodies, these objects form an imaginary of human gestures associated with the uprising. Art historian and curator Georges Didi-Huberman dedicated the exhibition Uprisings (2016–17) to this theme, assembling artworks…

Subscribe to our newsletter

Related Content

post Presents: Unsettled Dust—Archives, Epistemologies, Images

These presentations and panel discussion at MoMA brought together four filmmakers and artists who work in expanded documentary modes, using existing footage, archival research, interviews, and scripted narratives to produce imaginative accounts of transnational struggles, solidarities, and interventions. Using moving images, some of these practitioners interrogate the anti-colonial and anti-imperialist movements of the mid-late 20th…